Tucking Mill Industrial History

To the naked eye, the secluded cottages at Tucking Mill are a luxurious retreat in the rural countryside, you would hardly believe the site was just a stone’s throw from the bustling UNESCO city of Bath. However, this tranquil location holds a rich industrial history, hidden behind the property are the remains of a past era which once shaped the valley around it.

Image Copyright: rudloescene.co.uk

Tucking Mill gained its name from after a process in the woollen industry known as tucking, which was undertaken in an old mill building which once stood by Tucking Mill cottage. Sadly, it fell into disuse by 1798, before it was bought by William Smith, who landscaped the original pond and neighbouring woodland, before reconstructing the site as a saw mill to cut stone for London’s trade.

Image Copyright: Derek Harper, geograph.org

Smith would utilise a tramway to get the stone from the nearby quarry to the mill and then onwards through the former canal, which once flowed in front of the mill-side cottage. Unfortunately, the scheme failed, leaving Smith in debt, forcing him to sell the cottage and the saw mill, together with settling ponds and drying shed, were used for processing Fuller’s Earth, mined from the nearby Horsecombe Vale, with the remains of the mill demolished in 1979 to construct the present lake.

Image Copyright: catelouge.millsarchieve.org

Today the current site benefits from a diverse area of flora and fauna, with some of the surrounding meadows protected to encourage the growth rare species. The viaduct and tranquil lake remain as a nod to Tucking Mill’s industrial heritage and are a welcomed scene along a brisk walk from the rental cottages available for couples and families alike to enjoy. Consider your stay, just take a look at our website.