Picnics and Peacocks in Corsham

Nestled in the rural Wiltshire countryside, only 10 miles from Bath, is the historic market town of Corsham, where you will find a delightful array of independent shops and restaurants along its charming streets, all whilst peacocks roam freely from their neighbouring home of Corsham Court. Offering a mellow escape from the bustling streets of Bath, there are good transport links to explore the surrounding area, including Lacock and Castle Combe, on the fringe of the Cotswolds.

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It may be unassuming at first, but this charming town also has a vibrant arts scene, with The Pound providing a bustling arts hub, with theatre, music and art on show. With studious writers emerging from the creative university at Corsham Court. Amongst the Georgian stone buildings, there is a street market held every Tuesday, with an array of local produce to choose from, ideal for packing a family or romantic picnic, with many surrounding cafes, restaurants and pubs to please all as well.

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The high street has seen many stars grace is presence over the years, proving a popular place for filming. A number of illustrious films and TV dramas have placed their backdrops in this rural haven, most prominently transforming into 18th Century Truro for BBC One’s Poldark, as well as hit historic series, such as Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Larkrise to Candleford and The Suspicions of Mr Whicher.

Image Copyright: Corsham.gov.uk

You may also want to take a stroll round the Elizabethan grandeur of Corsham Court, a Saxon Royal Manor dating back to 1582 and home of the Methuen Family. It was bought in the mid-18th century to display Sir Paul Methuen’s celebrated collection of 16th and 17th century Old Master paintings. The intricate plasterwork in the 72ft long Picture Gallery, designed by Capability Brown, which along with the other State Rooms, still retain their original damask wall hangings and Chippendale furniture.

Image Copyright: Visit Wiltshire

The landscaped gardens surrounding the property were created by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, who changed the national landscape, creating a style depicting an impression of the quintessential English countryside. He was commissioned to re-model the house and gardens in 1760, at the height of his career, creating a ha-ha, walkway, along with numerous Cedars trees and an impressive Oriental Plane. You can view for yourself the gothic bath house, lily pond and arboretum, with a wonderful collection of magnolias. The surrounding parkland also includes views of the 13-acre lake and lawns, the majority of which is open to dog walkers all year round.