Uncover Hidden Gems at Bath Abbey

No visit to Bath is complete without a visit to its iconic Abbey, located right in the heart of town. Wandering through the surrounding courtyards you will immediately witness the striking grandeur of this magnificent structure, which holds a very special atmosphere inside. Admire the honey-coloured stone façade, with its heightened stained-glass windows and fine-fan vaulting, making for an uplifting space of Christian worship for more over 1000 years.

(Image Copyright: taylorsofbath.co.uk)

On arrival you are likely to approach by the West front and its unique ladders of Angels, inspired by the Bishop of Bath – Oliver King’s dream of ascending and descending angels, which not only paved the way for this interesting design, but a proposal for a new Abbey church. Bath Abbey is known to be the last great medieval cathedral to be built in England. Since then it has seen stood through many conflicts, including World Wars and religious reforms, it has seen the first King of all England crowned and has endured several of its own reincarnations since its foundations from 757 AD.

(Image Copyright: Baz Richardson – Flickr)

To get a better view of the beguiling structure, you may want to partake in the daily Tower Tours (every day except Sunday), which offer the chance to ascend the spiral staircase and go behind the scenes, with a visit to the ringing chamber and bell; sit behind the clock face, before standing on the roof to gain fantastic views over the city from above. Tickets are available from the Abbey Shop.

(Image Copyright: bathabbey.org)

Pilgrims and visitors alike, visit Bath Abbey throughout the year, each arriving with their own expectations and beliefs, all of which have been made welcome. The Abbey has quickly become a popular attraction in the South West region and regular services take place throughout the week, providing an opportunity to not only admire the architecture, but join in prayer and music.

If planning to visit, please note: the North Aisle and part of the Nave are closed until mid-2020, giving to due to important building work and repairs, as part of the Footprint project.